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Tag Archives: Civilization

Molecular archaeology

IMAGE: This is a blind cave salamander (Proteus anguinus). view more  Credit: Photo: Patrick Cabrol Copyrights: Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) Using the largest and most informative molecular phylogenetic dataset ever analysed, evolutionary biologists were able to construct a new phylogenetic tree of jawed vertebrates. This new tree resolves several key relationships that have remained controversial, including the identification of lungfishes as the closest living relatives of land vertebrates. The evolution of jawed vertebrates is part of our own history since humans belong to the tetrapods more specifically we are mammals, or, even more specifically, primates. The study utilised …

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Possible Extinct Human Relative Detected in Saliva

BUFFALO, NEW YORK—According to a report in The International Business Times, researchers led by Omer Gokcumen of the University at Buffalo say they detected a “ghost” species of ancient hominin while they were studying a protein that occurs in saliva and its influence on the bacteria in the human mouth. To study the protein, known as MUC7, the researchers examined the MUC7 gene in more than 2,500 modern human genomes. The researchers say a version of the gene found in people living in sub-Saharan Africa was “wildly different” from those found in other modern humans. Gokcumen explained that even the …

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18th-Century Plague Victims Unearthed in Medieval Cemetery

POZNAŃ, POLAND—The remains of three people who may have died during an early eighteenth-century epidemic have been unearthed at the site of a medieval cemetery in west-central Poland, according to a report in Science & Scholarship in Poland. A silver coin helped archaeologists date the burials. “The medieval graves are dug deep beneath the surface of the earth, so it was a surprise to discover three skeletons above them,” said archaeologist Pawel Pawlak. As many as eight or nine thousand people, or 65 percent of the population of Poznań, are thought to have died of the plague in 1709. “The …

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Small Pot Unearthed at Scotland’s Ness of Brodgar

ORKNEY, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that a rare small pot with a “waisted” profile has been discovered at the Ness of Brodgar, a 5,000-year-old complex of monumental stone buildings enclosed by thick stone walls. Victorian archaeologists suggested such pots could have held incense, perhaps in ceremonies, according to site director Nick Card. He added that such pots seem to be associated with the burials, but analysis of residues in the pots has been inconclusive. The pots could also have been used to carry embers for cremations, he said. To read in-depth about the Ness of Brodgar, go to “Neolithic Europe’s Remote …

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A History of Citrus Fruit

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—Archaeobotanist Dafna Langgut of Tel Aviv University has traced the spread of citrus fruit from Southeast Asia to the Mediterranean, according to a report in Live Science. She used ancient texts, murals, coins, and other artifacts to study the ancient citrus trade, and she tracked the spread of citrus fruits from Southeast Asia into the Mediterranean through fossil pollen, charcoals, seeds, and other fruit remains. Langgut found that by the third and second centuries B.C., the citron had spread to the western Mediterranean from the Levant, where a 2,500-year-old fruit was found in a Persian-style garden in Jerusalem. …

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Archaeologists unearth 2,700-year old reservoir in Israel

Israeli archaeologists digging near the city of Rosh Ha-Ayin have uncovered a remarkably large 2,700-year-old water system surrounded by wall engravings that dates back to the end of the Iron Age. The system, which includes a 13-foot-deep reservoir that is 66 feet long, was built beneath a large structure with walls that extended nearly 164 feet, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced last week. Its size suggests that it was an administrative site built to control the region’s water supply. “The structure exposed in this excavation is different from most of the previously discovered farmsteads,” said Gilad Itach, director of excavations …

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Digging it: Major archaeology project underway on Rogers Island

FORT EDWARD — David Starbuck and his archaeology students have dug for history at the Lake George Battlefield, at a Shaker village in New Hampshire and in and around Rogers Island in Fort Edward. Still, this summer’s dig at Rogers Island is something special for Starbuck, his SUNY Adirondack students and the volunteers who come out annually to help him do his research. “This is the key summer for making big discoveries here,” Starbuck said Wednesday. “We have a chance to dig in places we have not dug before, and they are places where we think we will find a …

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AIA Event Listings – Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists

International Archaeology Day (IAD) is a celebration of archaeology and the thrill of discovery. Every October the Archaeological Institute of America and organizations around the world present archaeological programs and activities for people of all ages and interests. In past years Milwaukee IAD activities have drawn upwards of 60 members of the public and have provided fun and interactive ways to explore themed topics and a variety of archaeological subjects. This year to celebrate International Archaeology Day the AIA Milwaukee Society is hosting “Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists.” Milwaukee and the surrounding areas have a …

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PICTURES: Students unearth relics of history in Foxearth archaeology project

High school students helped to unearth a breadth of buried artifacts in Foxearth last week, as part of an initiative to encourage more young people to make the jump to university. The Access Cambridge Archaeology (ACA) outreach unit, funded by the University of Cambridge, led pupils from Thomas Gainsborough School, Samuel Ward Academy and Ormiston Sudbury Academy on excavations at Foxearth Hall Barn, with the goal of helping them to make new discoveries and develop their skills and confidence. The Access Cambridge Archaeological outreach unit were digging in Foxearth with local schools Pictured: Tara Whitehead (Samuel Ward) PICTURE: Mecha Morton …

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Regional maritime archaeology symposium held in Hagatna

A regional maritime archaeology symposium was held at the Guam Museum over the weekend. It brought together experts to discuss the management, interpretation and recovery of underwater World War II sites in Palau, Saipan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Chuuk and Guam. The all day event included panels and research presentations focused on underwater remnants from the last World War. There are over 3,800 underwater shipwrecks and aircraft that together make up the underwater cultural heritage in the Asia-Pacific region. More interesting Articles from

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