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Tag Archives: Nasa

NASA Wants YOU to Be a Citizen Scientist for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

A still from a new NASA video describing how a participant can use the free Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) smartphone app to record local temperatures, which drop during a total or partial solar eclipse. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Rich Melnick A new NASA app will allow folks across the United States to become citizen scientists and collect data for an interactive map. The NASA-sponsored Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program launched the app to allow enthusiastic spectators to document their solar eclipse observations wherever they may be along path of the …

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Aging Mars Rover Captures Gorgeous ‘Sprained Ankle’ Panorama (Photos)

This June 2017 view from the Pancam on NASA’s Opportunity Mars rover shows the area just above “Perseverance Valley” on a large crater’s rim. A broad notch in the crest of the rim, at right, might have been a spillway for a fluid that carved the valley, out of sight on the other side of the rim. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ. A striking panorama by NASA’s Mars rover Opportunity shows a crater-rim notch that may have been carved by liquid water long ago. The photo is a mosaic of multiple images taken from June 7 through June 19 — a time …

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Imagine All the People: When Cassini Looked Back at Earth

Whatever disagreements may plague humanity, the international Cassini-Huygens mission has proved that we are capable of great collaboration. On July 19, 2013, during an orbit into the shadows behind Saturn — where the planet’s rings were backlit by the sun — the Cassini probe’s narrow-angle camera was able to find its origin point: the speck in the sky named Earth. And, knowing Cassini was looking, some much smaller specks, human Earthlings, “waved hello” to the spacecraft and, therefore, to one another. Earlier in the mission, on Sept. 15, 2006, Cassini had taken frames to compile a backlit image of Saturn …

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Shuttle-Era Cargo Module to Become Deep Space Habitat Prototype

Lockheed Martin will repurpose a space shuttle-era Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to become a test and astronaut training prototype for NASA’s deep space habitat. Credit: Lockheed Martin/NASA via collectSPACE.com A cargo container that was built to fly on NASA’s space shuttles is being repurposed as a prototype for a deep space habitat. Lockheed Martin announced it will refurbish the Donatello multi-purpose logistics module (MLPM), transforming from it from its original, unrealized role as a supply conveyor for the International Space Station to a test and training model of a living area for astronauts working beyond Earth orbit. The work is …

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Giant ‘Rogue’ Worlds Are Less Common Than Scientists Thought

An artist’s impression of a gravitational microlensing event by a free-floating planet. Credit: J. Skowron/Warsaw University Observatory There probably aren’t nearly as many giant planets zooming alone through the Milky Way galaxy as scientists had thought, a new study reports. Previous research had suggested that huge “rogue” or “unbound” worlds, which have no discernible host star, are extremely common in the Milky Way, perhaps outnumbering stars by a factor of 2 to 1. But that’s probably not the case, according to the new study. “We found that Jupiter-mass [rogue] planets are at least 10 times less frequent than previously thought,” …

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The Moon’s Interior Could Contain Lots of Water, Study Shows

Ancient volcanic deposits on the moon reveal new evidence about the lunar interior, suggesting it contains substantial amounts of water. Using satellite data, scientists from Brown University studied lunar pyroclastic deposits, layers of rock that likely formed from large volcanic eruptions. The magma associated with these explosive events is carried to the moon’s surface from very deep within its interior, according to a study published today (July 24) in Nature Geoscience.   Previous studies have observed traces of water ice in shadowed regions at the lunar poles. However, this water is likely the result of hydrogen that comes from solar wind, according to …

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NASA Unveils 2018 Launch Targets for Private Spaceships Built by Boeing, SpaceX

WASHINGTON — Both NASA and the two companies developing commercial crew vehicles say those efforts remain on schedule for test flights that are in some cases less than a year away. NASA published July 20 what it called “the most recent publicly-releasable dates” of the test flights of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon vehicles. Each company, under terms of Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contracts awarded in September 2014, are required to first fly an uncrewed test flight of their spacecraft, followed by one with astronauts on board. The latest SpaceX schedule calls for an uncrewed test flight in February 2018, …

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Mishap to Delay Launch of NASA Communications Satellite

TDRS-M is the third and final spacecraft in a series built by Boeing for NASA. The spacecraft provide S-, Ka- and Ku-band communications services for the International Space Station, Hubble Space Telescope, and other spacecraft in Earth orbit. Credit: NASA WASHINGTON — NASA announced July 21 that the launch of a communications satellite previously scheduled for early August will be postponed to replace an antenna damaged during launch preparations. In a statement issued late July 21, NASA said the agency, with satellite manufacturer Boeing and launch services provider United Launch Alliance, “are reviewing a new launch date in August” for the …

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Are Mars’ Trojan Asteroids Pieces of the Red Planet?

A mosaic of the Valles Marineris hemisphere of Mars. This view is similar to what one would see from a spacecraft, according to NASA. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech The Trojan asteroids that follow Mars in its orbit might have come from the planet itself, blown off in an ancient impact rather than being late arrivals, a new study suggests.  Several planets in Earth’s solar system have Trojan asteroids — bodies that run ahead of or behind the planet. Jupiter, for example, has thousands. Earth has at least one, discovered in 2010. Uranus, Neptune and Venus also have them. Trojan asteroids are so …

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The ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Cast Is Full of Trek Fans

The cast of “Star Trek: Discovery” snaps a selfie with the crowd at the show’s Comic-Con 2017 panel on July 22, 2017 in San Diego, California. Credit: Francis Specker © 2017 CBS Interactive. SAN DIEGO — What would it be like for a bunch of “Star Trek” fans to become crew members on the Starship Enterprise? Mind-blowing, according to many of the cast members of the upcoming series “Star Trek: Discovery.” “The first time I held a phaser, my head almost exploded,” said Anthony Rapp, a fan of the franchise who plays Lt. Paul Stamets on the new show. Rapp …

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